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Interning for a future

UCPD officer James Echols simulates arrest procedures on Daniel Oh, 17, a UCLA Community School student.

A police officer has a 17-year-old student under arrest, legs apart and hands behind his back. The officer slowly reaches to his belt for his handcuffs and locks them onto his wrists.

Do not be alarmed. Daniel Oh, an eleventh grade student at the UCLA Community School, is interning at the University of California Police Department (UCPD). Officer James Echols is using Oh to model the appropriate arrest protocol and procedures.

This is made possible through UCLA Community School internship program, which partners with different departments at UCLA to provide students with hands-on experience from people already established in a career field.

“I actually like that I have the chance to be in an internship at UCLA,” Oh said. “I get a real world experience while I’m in high school, I think that’ll be helpful.”

The goal of the internship is for the students to gain insight into careers that match their interests, while implementing classroom knowledge in real life situations.

“It is a unique program because it’s based at UCLA,” said Program Coordinator Jaime Del Razo, a fifth-year Ph.D. student at UCLA’s Graduate School of Education and Information Studies. He added that the relationship between the internship program and this university helps them ensure their students are college ready upon graduation from the school.

While only in its first year, this program consists of four different sites at UCLA: UCPD, the Broadcasting Department, the Daily Bruin, and UC All Campus Consortium on Research for Diversity (UC/ACCORD), which is a research unit dedicated to examining educational inequalities in public education.

Eleventh grade student, Janeth Nunez, is interning at the Broadcasting Department and is making a documentary about the interns’ experiences in the program because she believes their role in pioneering this program is important.

“When I heard it was an internship at UCLA I thought wow, you don’t get an opportunity like this all the time, I have to take it if it’s going to teach me something,” said Nunez.

Students also build confidence and gain social skills. “It has taught me how to interact with people when you first meet them; at the beginning I was quiet but once I got comfortable I was able to talk to them,” Juan Carlos Mejia, an eleventh grade student said

Mejia, 18, is an intern with UC/ACCORD and is currently helping organize data for the California Educational Opportunity Report. In collaboration with UCLA’s Institute for Democracy, Education, and Access (IDEA), UC/ACCORD publishes this yearly report to examine California students’ educational resources.

Mejia will develop his own similar project by asking fellow students questions about how they are being affected by the budgets cuts and how they feel their principal is helping them receive an education. Having gained much from this program he is happy to utilize his experiences to help others.

“I like it a lot, I’m starting to like talking with others about helping them, it feels good to tell someone else that needs help, to tell them the struggles you went through,” Mejia said.

The students in this program develop a sense of agency in their education by working on their own projects. The experience also encourages them to develop long-term career goals.

“Just the fact that it’s a new experience and I would have never imagined going to a site and working with professional people… I can’t wait till I’m up there too, said Nunez.”

Protest Brings Awareness to Budget Cuts

Protesters gather around Kerckhoff steps

Graduate students, unions and faculty members protested against budget cuts, fee hikes and layoffs in front of Kerckhoff steps on Oct. 7.

The protest, held by Affiliates of UC Fights Back, drew an estimated crowd of a hundred in order to raise awareness on the financial situation.

Although the protest was organized by UCLA graduate students, the majority of those present came from various college campuses including UC Santa Barbara, Pierce College and Mission College.

“The protest is part of a larger coordinated nationwide day of action in defense of education,” said Hugo Sarmiento, a graduate student in urban planning.

As protesters shouted chants between speeches, students looked on briefly before continuing down Bruinwalk seemingly uninterested in the event.

Dan Boris, a public health student, emphasized the direct effect budget cuts will have on graduate students.

Boris stated his desire to serve a low income community health clinic after graduating, but argued that this might not be a possibility due to the substantial amount of debt that he will have accumulated due to the rise in student fees.

“We’ll be forced to find a high-paying job in order to pay back loans instead of serving poor communities,” said Boris.

In addition to graduate students, the largest visible presence was made of union and faculty members who urged students to get involved in the political process and vote in support of public education.

After a brief introduction, Ellis Stewart of University Professional and Technical Employees, a UC employee union, approached the audience and passionately laid out his union’s grievances.

“We need transparency,” said Stewart to a growing and responsive crowd.

Investing money into the UC system and fairness in the face of cutbacks were Stewart’s main talking points, as he accused the regents of hiding behind a bad economy.

“We are here and we are going to fight for our rights,” said Stewart, ending his speech to a roar of applause.

Graduate student Ellen Cachola then led the small crowd in a series of chants before delivering an impassioned poem.

Following her poem, Cachola instructed the crowd to split into two groups where facilitators led a short teach in.

“The goal of the teach-in is to get feedback from students and organizations,” said Ernesto Zumaya, external vice president of the Bruin Democrats. He led a discussion about coalition building.

Zumaya, who was not part of organizing the event, wanted to focus on expanding the analysis on larger issues and plan for a stronger student worker alliance.

The UCLA Police were visibly present as both foot and bicycle patrol officers were monitoring the rally.

Lieutenant Maureen O’Connell stated that they were on “standard protest deployment mode.”

There were no reported injuries or arrests made according to University of California Police Department.

UCLA Protest October 2010 from LaGente.org on Vimeo.

Protest Brings Awareness to Budget Cuts

Protesters gather around Kerckhoff steps

Graduate students, unions and faculty members protested against budget cuts, fee hikes and layoffs in front of Kerckhoff steps on Oct. 7.

The protest, held by Affiliates of UC Fights Back, drew an estimated crowd of a hundred in order to raise awareness on the financial situation.

Although the protest was organized by UCLA graduate students, the majority of those present came from various college campuses including UC Santa Barbara, Pierce College and Mission College.

“The protest is part of a larger coordinated nationwide day of action in defense of education,” said Hugo Sarmiento, a graduate student in urban planning.

As protesters shouted chants between speeches, students looked on briefly before continuing down Bruinwalk seemingly uninterested in the event.

Dan Boris, a public health student, emphasized the direct effect budget cuts will have on graduate students.

Boris stated his desire to serve a low income community health clinic after graduating, but argued that this might not be a possibility due to the substantial amount of debt that he will have accumulated due to the rise in student fees.

“We’ll be forced to find a high-paying job in order to pay back loans instead of serving poor communities,” said Boris.

In addition to graduate students, the largest visible presence was made of union and faculty members who urged students to get involved in the political process and vote in support of public education.

After a brief introduction, Ellis Stewart of University Professional and Technical Employees, a UC employee union, approached the audience and passionately laid out his union’s grievances.

“We need transparency,” said Stewart to a growing and responsive crowd.

Investing money into the UC system and fairness in the face of cutbacks were Stewart’s main talking points, as he accused the regents of hiding behind a bad economy.

“We are here and we are going to fight for our rights,” said Stewart, ending his speech to a roar of applause.

Graduate student Ellen Cachola then led the small crowd in a series of chants before delivering an impassioned poem.

Following her poem, Cachola instructed the crowd to split into two groups where facilitators led a short teach in.

“The goal of the teach-in is to get feedback from students and organizations,” said Ernesto Zumaya, external vice president of the Bruin Democrats. He led a discussion about coalition building.

Zumaya, who was not part of organizing the event, wanted to focus on expanding the analysis on larger issues and plan for a stronger student worker alliance.

The UCLA Police were visibly present as both foot and bicycle patrol officers were monitoring the rally.

Lieutenant Maureen O’Connell stated that they were on “standard protest deployment mode.”

There were no reported injuries or arrests made according to University of California Police Department.

UCLA Protest October 2010 from LaGente.org on Vimeo.