Posts

Protest Brings Awareness to Budget Cuts

Protesters gather around Kerckhoff steps

Graduate students, unions and faculty members protested against budget cuts, fee hikes and layoffs in front of Kerckhoff steps on Oct. 7.

The protest, held by Affiliates of UC Fights Back, drew an estimated crowd of a hundred in order to raise awareness on the financial situation.

Although the protest was organized by UCLA graduate students, the majority of those present came from various college campuses including UC Santa Barbara, Pierce College and Mission College.

“The protest is part of a larger coordinated nationwide day of action in defense of education,” said Hugo Sarmiento, a graduate student in urban planning.

As protesters shouted chants between speeches, students looked on briefly before continuing down Bruinwalk seemingly uninterested in the event.

Dan Boris, a public health student, emphasized the direct effect budget cuts will have on graduate students.

Boris stated his desire to serve a low income community health clinic after graduating, but argued that this might not be a possibility due to the substantial amount of debt that he will have accumulated due to the rise in student fees.

“We’ll be forced to find a high-paying job in order to pay back loans instead of serving poor communities,” said Boris.

In addition to graduate students, the largest visible presence was made of union and faculty members who urged students to get involved in the political process and vote in support of public education.

After a brief introduction, Ellis Stewart of University Professional and Technical Employees, a UC employee union, approached the audience and passionately laid out his union’s grievances.

“We need transparency,” said Stewart to a growing and responsive crowd.

Investing money into the UC system and fairness in the face of cutbacks were Stewart’s main talking points, as he accused the regents of hiding behind a bad economy.

“We are here and we are going to fight for our rights,” said Stewart, ending his speech to a roar of applause.

Graduate student Ellen Cachola then led the small crowd in a series of chants before delivering an impassioned poem.

Following her poem, Cachola instructed the crowd to split into two groups where facilitators led a short teach in.

“The goal of the teach-in is to get feedback from students and organizations,” said Ernesto Zumaya, external vice president of the Bruin Democrats. He led a discussion about coalition building.

Zumaya, who was not part of organizing the event, wanted to focus on expanding the analysis on larger issues and plan for a stronger student worker alliance.

The UCLA Police were visibly present as both foot and bicycle patrol officers were monitoring the rally.

Lieutenant Maureen O’Connell stated that they were on “standard protest deployment mode.”

There were no reported injuries or arrests made according to University of California Police Department.

UCLA Protest October 2010 from LaGente.org on Vimeo.

Protest Brings Awareness to Budget Cuts

Protesters gather around Kerckhoff steps

Graduate students, unions and faculty members protested against budget cuts, fee hikes and layoffs in front of Kerckhoff steps on Oct. 7.

The protest, held by Affiliates of UC Fights Back, drew an estimated crowd of a hundred in order to raise awareness on the financial situation.

Although the protest was organized by UCLA graduate students, the majority of those present came from various college campuses including UC Santa Barbara, Pierce College and Mission College.

“The protest is part of a larger coordinated nationwide day of action in defense of education,” said Hugo Sarmiento, a graduate student in urban planning.

As protesters shouted chants between speeches, students looked on briefly before continuing down Bruinwalk seemingly uninterested in the event.

Dan Boris, a public health student, emphasized the direct effect budget cuts will have on graduate students.

Boris stated his desire to serve a low income community health clinic after graduating, but argued that this might not be a possibility due to the substantial amount of debt that he will have accumulated due to the rise in student fees.

“We’ll be forced to find a high-paying job in order to pay back loans instead of serving poor communities,” said Boris.

In addition to graduate students, the largest visible presence was made of union and faculty members who urged students to get involved in the political process and vote in support of public education.

After a brief introduction, Ellis Stewart of University Professional and Technical Employees, a UC employee union, approached the audience and passionately laid out his union’s grievances.

“We need transparency,” said Stewart to a growing and responsive crowd.

Investing money into the UC system and fairness in the face of cutbacks were Stewart’s main talking points, as he accused the regents of hiding behind a bad economy.

“We are here and we are going to fight for our rights,” said Stewart, ending his speech to a roar of applause.

Graduate student Ellen Cachola then led the small crowd in a series of chants before delivering an impassioned poem.

Following her poem, Cachola instructed the crowd to split into two groups where facilitators led a short teach in.

“The goal of the teach-in is to get feedback from students and organizations,” said Ernesto Zumaya, external vice president of the Bruin Democrats. He led a discussion about coalition building.

Zumaya, who was not part of organizing the event, wanted to focus on expanding the analysis on larger issues and plan for a stronger student worker alliance.

The UCLA Police were visibly present as both foot and bicycle patrol officers were monitoring the rally.

Lieutenant Maureen O’Connell stated that they were on “standard protest deployment mode.”

There were no reported injuries or arrests made according to University of California Police Department.

UCLA Protest October 2010 from LaGente.org on Vimeo.

IDEAS Aid Undocumented Students

Improving Dreams, Equality, Access and Success (IDEAS) presented a workshop in January explaining the effects of the University of California’s 32% fee hike on undocumented students. High school students and other campus organizations as well as students from San Fernando Valley attended, uniting in an effort to help undocumented students pay tuition, attend college, and graduate with the possibility of continuing their education.

In the United States, there are 65,000 undocumented students who graduate from high school every year, including the 25,000 who graduate in California. However, only 5 to 10 percent reach higher education and even fewer graduate. Because many of undocumented students face poverty, these fee increases may continue to lower their graduation rate.

Undocumented students are penned as out-of-state students, thus they have to pay a higher tuition. Fortunately, the AB 540 law in California allows students who have lived here since their youth or who have attended a California high school for at least three years to pay in-state tuition.

Testimonials by undocumented students highlighted the financial difficulties they have had to overcome to attend UCLA, and unfortunately, these do not end once accepted to the university. To pay for tuition, everyday necessities are constant challenges for these students. One student said, “You won’t eat so you can buy a book,” while another comments that these sacrifices are “what it takes to get that money.” Hardships become heavier when fees are raised for the UC system, forcing these students to attend college part-time, and perhaps eventually dropping out altogether. A third student describes how these difficulties affect a parent’s mentality; though at first “the person who pushed me [was the one who] saw the obstacles,” it is more and more apparent that the financial burden may be too much.

In order to address this issue of access, IDEAS is pushing for institutional aid to be made available to undocumented students. Students pay fees that comprise institutional aid, but because they are undocumented, they are shut out from receiving it. IDEAS is also fundraising to pay fee for undocumented students. You can contribute by visiting their website at ideasla.org.

Highlights of Nov. 19 UC Protest

LOS ANGELES – Over a two day period, UC students came to UCLA to protest at the UC Regents meeting which took place at Covel Commons.  The protest started as early as midnight and ended as late as 7p.m., with the release of Campbell Hall.  UC Regents approved the tuition and fees increase, but protests continued in order to demonstrate to The Regents that both students and workers will not stop with their struggle.

Video Footage: Maria Renteria.

UC Protest Day 2 from LaGente.org on Vimeo.