Vagina Monologues 2014

If your vagina could talk, what would it say? If it could dress, what would it wear?

Cast Members of the Vagina Monologues tell you everything there is to know about vaginas!

Hosted by UCLA’s very own Social Awareness Network for Activism through Art (SANAA), the Vagina Monologues works to promote and embrace everything that comes along with being a woman. What started off as a celebration for women is now seen as a movement to help combat gender inequalities and raise awareness against gender violence. Cast members engage the audience to feel happy, angry, sad, and even awe by presenting different aspects of feminine experiences. Their ultimate goal: deconstruct the conceiving notion that vaginas are taboo and embrace it as a tool of women empowerment.

Faith Kearns shows the audience a painting of her “unique, beautiful, fabulous vagina” from her monologue, “The Vagina Workshop”

Faith Kearns shows the audience a painting of her “unique, beautiful, fabulous vagina” from her monologue, “The Vagina Workshop.”

Sara Beil is all smiles after sharing with the audience how she comes to love her vagina in “Because He Liked to Look At It”.

Sara Beil is all smiles after sharing with the audience how she comes to love her vagina in “Because He Liked to Look At It.”

Jen Lainez gets the crowd warmed up with her monologue, “My Angry Vagina”. Does anyone else feel heated?

Jen Lainez gets the crowd warmed up with her monologue, “My Angry Vagina”. Does anyone else feel heated?

Performed by Mitali Gupta and Laura Savage, “My Vagina Was My Village”, tells the untold and devastating experiences of Bosnian women refugees.

Performed by Mitali Gupta and Laura Savage, “My Vagina Was My Village”, tells the untold and devastating experiences of Bosnian women refugees.

 

Genevieve Zimmerman gets the audience worked up with her different tones in moans. Her performance, “The Woman Who Loved to Make Other Vaginas Happy” included its very own UCLA moan!

Genevieve Zimmerman gets the audience worked up with her different tones in moans. Her performance, “The Woman Who Loved to Make Other Vaginas Happy” included its very own UCLA moan!

 

In, “I Was There in the Room,” Julia Saunders expresses awe and appreciation for what a vagina is capable of doing: reproducing human life.

In, “I Was There in the Room,” Julia Saunders expresses awe and appreciation for what a vagina is capable of doing: reproducing human life.

Lea Guillory leaves the crowd with a last impactful note, “until we refuse to accept anything that does not include all, one billion will rise for justice.”

Lea Guillory leaves the crowd with a last impactful note, “until we refuse to accept anything that does not include all, one billion will rise for justice.”

 

Maria Varela

 

 

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